Over the Banister of Heaven

Sometimes I wonder what it looked like from Heaven when Jesus first came to earth. The Son of God, God Himself, left behind His glory and majesty, the praise and beauty of Heaven, to enter into time and space as one of us. Remember this is God we’re talking about! Since Jesus is God, that means that God left Heaven to limit Himself in the form of a man, to live with us, to die for us, to rise again for us, and to prepare a place in Heaven, soon to return for us!

Let me just take a moment to talk about this: The immortal God came to die as the required sacrifice for our sins. You know all the sacrifices in the Bible that God had the Israelites make? Those were a picture, a representation of what was to come. But back to the first topic: What did Jesus’ life on earth look like from Heaven?

Truth be told, only God and those in Heaven know. But I like to try to imagine it sometimes. What must that have been like? The Son of the One True King put aside almost everything that resembled Godly majesty, and veiled His glory in human form so we could see Him. He stepped down from Heaven, and that is a very large step! I wonder what the angels’ faces looked like as they watched Jesus “over the banister,” so to speak. I wonder what they said.

“That’s Him! He’s a baby! Wow… What love He has for His creation…”
“Look at Him growing up! How strange!”
“He is dying… He is in deep anguish and suffering… and we are not to help Him…”
“But death has no hold on Him! He lives!”
“He’s back! Jesus is back! Look! He bears scars now. What love He has for His creation!”
“Going back? When?”

I honestly don’t know that any of this is accurate, but considering how wondrous Jesus’ first coming is from our earthly perspective, how much more and differently wondrous from a Heavenly one?


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